Tag Archives: Thoughts

The Women Of Iran Can Bring About Change–If Not Suppressed

Originally published by Forbes

BYAmir Basiri

Mr. Basiri is an Iranian human rights activist and supporter of democratic regime change in Iran.

In Iran, a recent spate of acid attacks against women and the execution of a young woman charged with murdering her alleged rapist have turned the spotlight on the issue of women’s rights in the country. Although the events show a spike in human rights abuses against women in Iran, the discrimination against and suppression of Iranian women is nothing new and has been institutionalized in the very foundations and constitution of the clerical regime ruling the country.

But these events also betray the Iranian regime’s vain attempts at exuding power and frantic efforts to contain the numerous crises it is facing. It is also a reminder that women are the driving force behind the struggle against extremism and Islamic fundamentalism, and have the potential to bring about change in Iran and the region.

This is a reality that is fully understood by the Iranian regime, and explains why Tehran’s rulers resort to mounting up repression and pressure against the country’s female population whenever they feel the threat of social uprisings. Continue reading The Women Of Iran Can Bring About Change–If Not Suppressed

Free Access to Physicians

By Saied Mehdizadeh, Camp Liberty

hospital

Free access to physicians and medical services are one of the most basic human rights that no individual can deprive any other of. However, here in Camp Liberty near Baghdad International Airport, home to Iranian opposition members of the fascist regime ruling Iran, there is no sign of respecting this human rights principle. In fact, these rights are violated on a daily basis as easy as drinking a cup of water. When you pass by the Iraqi clinic in the camp you see patients suffering for months and waiting to exit the camp for visits or treatment in Baghdad hospitals. Continue reading Free Access to Physicians

Camp Liberty: Even time is taken hostage

By Hamid Imeni, Camp Liberty

hostage

In today’s world almost everyone is aware of the dirty act of hostage-taking. When one hears a phrase, reads it or sees it, like it or not similar actions and objectives, along with a repeated scenario, come to mind. However, the evil spirits in all the dirty frameworks are too similar and common, wherever they may be, and they only encourage more hideous crimes and actions.

Right now I want you to join me for a few moments to get informed with a new type of hostage taking. I have just one request: in any state you may be reading these lines, empty your thoughts for a few moments for the sake of the rights of human beings, so that you would completely understand and come along with me. Now I want to take you to a ‘prisonlike’ place where 2,800 noble and freedom-loving human beings are and one third of which are women. Therefore, during the next few moments that we reach there I prefer to brief you a bit on its history. The ironic part is that many people, meaning the so-called “human rights activists” have dubbed this place “Camp Liberty” and they insist the residents must accept this name, too. Continue reading Camp Liberty: Even time is taken hostage

I used to be a fundamentalist

By Vahed Saif, Camp Liberty

23 years ago in Iran I was a die-hard supporter of Ayatollah Khomeini, who depicted himself as the representative of God on Earth and said, “If you die for me you will go to Heaven.” Born in a poor, religious family I had no reason not to believe him. Low culture and poor economic status was one of the main elements that helped his recruiting, and at times it provided basic means that these individuals never had access to. The fundamentalists even described our poverty and hunger as a guarantee of our emancipation in life after death!

I was only 19 and the 1991 Persian Gulf War had just ended when I was enlisted in the Revolutionary Guards and we entered Iraq in a small group to promote Khomeini’s version of Islam. The mission that I was briefed on was to first deliver blows to Khomeini’s dissidents, meaning members of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran, and thus pursue our ultimate strategy being the occupation of Iraq. Continue reading I used to be a fundamentalist

Iran lurks behind the rise of sectarian violence in Iraq

Published by The Hill

By Heshmat Alavi

In the heat of the U.S.-led campaign against the Islamic State, a Sunni extremist group that has invaded large parts of Iraq and Syria, a recent report by Amnesty International gives a stark warning that not addressing extremism in its entirety and making the wrong decisions can lead to the deepening of the sectarian rift in Iraq and eventually trigger an irreversible disaster.

The document, which is based on thorough research in war-torn areas in Iraq, gives horrendous accounts of crimes recently committed in Iraq by Shiite extremist groups against the background of the fight against the Islamic State (formerly known as ISIS or ISIL). Groups sanctioned, backed and funded by the Iranian regime, and agents of the administration of former Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki have been targeting the Sunni community seemingly in reprisal or revenge for Islamic State attacks and at times also to extort money from the families of those they have abducted. Continue reading Iran lurks behind the rise of sectarian violence in Iraq

A choice

By Massoud Azadi

choices
It was spring 1981 and the time of universities’ summer holidays. I spoke to a friend of mine in Aachen University in order to work together for a few months to earn some money for a trip to Iran to visit our families, relatives and friends. We decided to do it and then bought souvenirs and set for Iran on July. To go by plane was expensive so we decided to go to Iran via land through Turkey, which was a good idea.

On the way we discussed many issues about our country Iran and how things were changed during the period we were away from the country, and about friends and families, also about our future and what each one of us planned for the future.

At the Iran-Turkey borders instead of the usual border police, the Pasdaran (Iranian revolutionary guard corps) checked our identifications before we boarded the bus. Their manner of checking us wasn’t friendly. They looked at everybody suspiciously and with skepticism. Continue reading A choice

When It Comes To ISIS, Iran Isn’t The Solution — It’s Part Of The Problem

Originally published on Forbes

By Amir Basiri

Mr. Basiri is an Iranian human rights activist and supporter of democratic regime change in Iran.

A misinterpretation of the principle “the enemy of my enemy is my friend” has led some to believe that the Iranian regime can actually be a contributing force to the international efforts that aim at eliminating the threat caused by the Islamic State, an extremist group that has in past months taken over a swath of territory straddling Iraq and Syria and aims at establishing what it purports to be an Islamic Caliphate.

The argument that backs such a proposition is that as a radical Sunni group, the Islamic State would prove to be an enemy of the radical Shiite regime ruling Iran, and thus Iran can be counted on to fight the Islamic State. Continue reading When It Comes To ISIS, Iran Isn’t The Solution — It’s Part Of The Problem