Tag Archives: people

Medical Siege against Camp Liberty, a crime against humanity

After Nouri al-Maliki assumed office as Iraq’s Prime Minister in 2005, and after the U.S. government vested Iraqi forces with the security of Camp Ashraf in 2009, an inhumane medical siege was placed against the residents of the camp. The siege came in tandem with a plethora of other illegal and repressive measures carried out by the Iraqi government and at the behest of the Iranian regime.

Even after the residents were transferred to Camp Liberty, in the vicinity of Baghdad International Airport (a forcible relocation that was sanctioned and encouraged by the U.S. and the UN), the government of Iraq continued to impose medical restrictions without relent, an undertaking that has so far caused the death of 21 patients in a most painful manner. The latest instance was Taghi Abassian, a resident who died from intentional delays and obstructions caused in his treatment process by Iraqi forces. Continue reading

Camp Liberty residents, victims of two prisons

By Nasrin Feizi, Camp Liberty

Females_in_PrisonA few weeks ago, we held a ceremony in honor of Taghi Abbasian, who lost his life as a result of the medical siege imposed on Camp Liberty, where I live with 3,000 other Iranian dissidents who seek freedom in their country. At the same time I came to a statement issued by Amnesty International. The statement warned the Iranian regime for depriving its sick political prisoners of receiving medical treatments in hospitals outside prison. The statement also mentioned names of some prisoners who were in severe health conditions.

I am a woman who has spent ten years in the Iranian regime’s prisons before coming to Camp Ashraf, and when I speak about prison-making in Camp Liberty, I feel it deep inside. Continue reading

Red stains on a white shroud

By Nazar Karim Beigi, Camp Liberty

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Ilam, with its sky-high mountains and fountains, is one of the most beautiful but at the same time poorest cities in western Iran. Though my country enjoys great fields of oil and gas resources but my family like many others had to resort to hard work to cope with poverty. I always asked myself, “why poverty!?” My friends and I struggled to earn a full meal, and going to school instead of laboring in the hot brickyards was a fancy for us.

In a cool breeze of a Friday afternoon I accompanied my friends to the only soccer stadium of the city to play as usual. We entered the stadium. In the middle of the playground’s lawn the sight of few armed men and two black-veiled armed women from IRGC (Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps) caught my attention. Continue reading

Better to die on your feet than to live on your knees

By Ahmad Rahbar, Camp Liberty

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It is a hot summer afternoon. The sun’s warmth is waning as dusk settles over a camp in the vicinity of the Baghdad International Airport. This camp is ironically called “Liberty.” The six-foot-tall concrete walls encircling the camp block out the horizon, depriving of the beautiful sunset for which the Babylon has earned fame.

The camp that was supposed to be a temporary transit location has been my home for the past three years. This place is a reminder of the prisons of the Iranian regime, where I spent four years of my life on charges of reading the “Mojahed” newspaper and believing in the ideals of freedom and democracy.

Inadvertently, old memories flashback in my mind and my thoughts take me back 35 years, when following the fall of the Shah regime, I joined the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI) to protect the achievements of the people’s revolution against the newly-established religious fascist regime. Continue reading

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Iraqi forces make Camp Liberty Iranians carry heavy loads, prevent use of forklift trucks

Iraqi forces deprive Camp Libety residents of using their own forklift trucks forcing them to carry heavy loads with their hands or on their backs

The anti-human torture has caused residents severe orthopedic diseases

The Iraqi forces continue to prevent residents of Camp Liberty from using their own forklift trucks. As a result of this anti-human measure, residents are forced to carry heavy loads with their hands or on their backs.

After the Iraqi forces prevented the transfer of dozens of forklift trucks from Ashraf to Camp Liberty, following numerous referrals by the residents to the United States and the United Nations authorities, in a trilateral agreement in November 2012 between UNAMI, the residents, and the Iraqi government, two forklift trucks were transferred from Ashraf to Camp Liberty. The Iraqi forces refused to hand over these two forklift trucks to the residents and it was decided that the forklift trucks be kept at the police battalion to be given to the residents on a daily basis and returned back at the end of the work. Continue reading

My sister will live on forever…

By Milad, Camp Liberty

100In today’s world, emotions can no longer be expressed as in the past, because the hearts and minds of all people have been filled with a fist-full of lies presented by smiling appeasing politicians aiming to crush the will of resistance in all of mankind, and force them to surrender and succumb to their demands. Innocent people’s hopes for a better life have turned into ashes and dust, and in many cases pools of blood. Novels and stories are forgotten forever, and school blackboards are empty of meaningful words. Yet we all know that it is us, and only us, who must conquer this heart of history, again, with our own sacrifice.

A few days ago I was walking in the harsh gravel streets of Camp Liberty in Iraq, and down the road a number of women residing in the camp were also heading to their section. I was drowned in my own thoughts and was silently reciting a poem in my mind. All of a sudden, an image flashed before my eyes. One of the women had fallen to the floor. I didn’t know what to do and just ran towards them and asked, “Can I help?” One of them answered, “Please find a car and hurry!” Continue reading

I too like democracy and freedom!

By Mohsen Bodaghi

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I write this pierce in Camp Liberty, Iraq.  It is years now that I have left my studies and left my country Iran for the hope of democracy and freedom. Years full of dangers and hardships. I never thought the path for freedom would be so hard and uneven. But these years have taught me that freedom comes at a high price. I sometimes tell myself, probably those who enjoy such gift do not realize its value and only when they lose it will they come to truly appreciate its value, like oxygen for living beings.

Some three years ago I was relocated to a prison called “Camp Liberty,” which makes it even worse since they have named a notorious prison “Liberty”, the very liberty that people throughout the world have paid a heavy price for.

Along with 3,500 of my friends, I moved to Liberty based on a “Memorandum of Understanding” signed between the UN and the government of Iraq. There are many clauses and promises in the MoU but all of them have been breached by the Iraqi government, and U.S. and UN have shut their eyes to such violations. Our demands on the other hand are so simple and primitive that it is difficult for me to even mention them. The surprising thing is that the Iraqi government does not even let us plant trees. Continue reading